Bach and Brahms for a Better Brain

Did you know that listening to classical music can make you smarter?

Raising the Brow

File:Croce-Mozart-Detail.jpg

Did you know that listening to classical music can make you smarter?

Well, at least according to one theory.

It’s called the Mozart Effect and as the theory goes, listening to classical music can temporarily improve certain brain functions. The theory also suggests that if you listen to composers like Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart as an infant it can have positive effects on brain development on a permanent basis.

The idea was first considered by a french researcher, Dr. Alfred A. Tomatis who coined the term “Mozart Effect.” He presented the idea in his 1991 book Pourquoi Mozart? in which he describes his attempt the train the ear and promote healing and development in the brain.

The theory gained some popularity and in 1997 a man named Don Campbell wrote a book called The Mozart Effect: Tapping the Power of Music to Heal the Body, Strengthen the Mind, and Unlock the Creative Spirit in which he writes…

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About kurtnemes
Writer and Education Professional. Specialties include Ethics, Personal Memoir, Classical music, Tai Chi, Stress Reduction, Meditation, Coping, Classical Music, Aging, Love, Joy, Compassion and Equanimity (& what interests me.)

One Response to Bach and Brahms for a Better Brain

  1. I had heard about that, but I also heard that a more recent and complete study showed that while Mozart does help the brain, especially the development of the brain in small children, (ages 3-5), the effects of listening to it after that time are only temporary and do not have any physical long-term effects on your intelligence. I wish I remember where I read that, but I’m sure you could find it by searching.

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