Michael Tippett: Fantasia Concertante on a Theme of Corelli, for String Orchestra

British composers never cease to amaze me. They never get the kind of exposure that Teutonic 3 B’s (Bach, Beethoven & Brahms) get, so I’m always amazed when I stumble upon some piece or composer heretofore unknown to me and it turns out to be delightful. Don’t know much about Tippett except what’s on Wikipedia. In his music I hear the lush harmonies and rhythms of Britten and the American-Armenian, Hovhannes. Wiki says he was a pacifist in WWII and was arrested for refusing to to any kind of replacement duty.

Michael Tippett (1905-1992), one of the most significant British composers of the twentieth century, retained an independent voice and an eclectic style throughout his long career. He wrote in virtually every genre, including symphonies, piano sonatas, string quartets, vocal music, choral music, and opera. His music is notable for its rhythmic vitality, melodic quirkiness, and distinctive orchestration. He first came to prominence in 1941 with his oratorio A Child of Our Time. He is especially remembered for two of his operas, The Midsummer Marriage and King Priam, his Fantasia Concertante on a Theme of Corelli, and his Concerto for Double String Orchestra. ~ Stephen Eddins, Rovi
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About kurtnemes
Writer and Education Professional. Specialties include Ethics, Personal Memoir, Classical music, Tai Chi, Stress Reduction, Meditation, Coping, Classical Music, Aging, Love, Joy, Compassion and Equanimity (& what interests me.)

4 Responses to Michael Tippett: Fantasia Concertante on a Theme of Corelli, for String Orchestra

  1. pianolearner says:

    Thanks for sharing this I had never heard it before.

    Like

  2. XperDunn says:

    Yeah, me neither–thanks a lot, Kurt. Sort of a modern update to Ralph Vaughan Williams…

    Like

  3. richibi says:

    a reserved thank you, I find Tippett, as I find many English composers, too ceremonious, dare I say, Anglican – cheers nevertheless, Richard

    Liked by 1 person

  4. kvennarad says:

    The piece was new to me too, but I thoroughly enjoyed listening to it.

    (I love the ‘ceremonious… Anglican…’ comment above!)

    Liked by 1 person

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