February 19, Elfrida Andrée (1841-1929)

Since July, I have been concentrating solely on female composers.  You can read about that in my post from July 19.  If I can’t find one born on the calendar day, I may not post.  On with today’s composer.

Elfrida Andrée (19 February 1841 – 11 January 1929), was a Swedish organist, composer, and conductor.  I only came across her music today, and I must say it is quite a nice surprise.  There’s not much about her on the English speaking websites, so this is about all I could find:  She and her sister, who became a famous opera singer, were both educated by their father.  Elfrida was active in the women’s suffragette movement in Sweden.

Piano Quintet in E minor
Concert Ouverture in D-major

Piano Trio No.2 1st movt.
Quartet in A minor

February 18, Rolande Falcinelli (1920 – 2006)

From Wikipedia:  “Rolande Falcinelli (18 February 1920 – 11 June 2006) was a French organist, pianist, composer, and pedagogue.

When she was 12, she entered the Paris Conservatory of Music, where she studied with the composer Marcel Dupré.  After winning Grand Prix de Rome in composition at the age of 22, she became a professor at the Conservatory, herself.

Épure, op. 66/1
Tempo di valzer (Sonata per Scherzare)

Triptyque op. 11
Veni Créator (Harm. Dupré), variation (R.Falcinelli)

no o 

February 15, birthday of Vilma von Webenau (1875-1953)

Since July, I have been concentrating solely on female composers.  You can read about that in my post from July 19.  If I can’t find one born on the calendar day, I may not post.  On with today’s composer.

Vilma von Webenau, (* 15 February 1875 in Constantinople; † 9 October 1953 in Vienna), composer, first student of Arnold Schönberg, granddaughter of Julie von Webenau, daughter of Arthur Weber Edler von Webenau, k. & k. counsellor in Constantinople

Befreiung

February 4, Ann Southam (1937-2010)

Since July, I have been concentrating solely on female composers.  You can read about that in my post from July 19.  If I can’t find one born on the calendar day, I may not post.  On with today’s composer.

Ann Southam was a Canadian composer who lived in Toronto and worked closely with the New Dance Group of Canada (later known as Toronto Dance Theatre).  These four selections show the breadth of her work from simple piano, to minimalism to 12 tone.

“Glass Houses” (Seven Circles)
Fast River #2

Glass Houses #12
Simple Lines of Enquiry

January 20, birthday of Yvonne Loriod (1924 – 2010)

Since July, I have been concentrating solely on female composers.  You can read about that in my post from July 19.  If I can’t find one born on the calendar day, I may not post.  On with today’s composer.

Yvonne Loriod was the second wife of composer Olivier Messiaen and herself  a composer, teacher and pianist.  As a student at the Paris Conservatory, her composition teacher was Messiaen.  At the age of 25, she was appointed professor at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris Her greatest fame and acclaim came as a concert pianist and she championed not only her professor’s compositions, but she also premiered pieces by other famous difficult works by composers like Bartok Piano Concerto number 2. After Messiaen’s wife died, Loriod married him, and in their later years continued to teach and mentor performers of Olivier’s works.

I can’t find any of her compositions online, but there are plenty of her performing Olivier’s and other’s works.

Messiaen: “Noel”
Debussy’s Etudes

Various Piano Works by Mozart
Messiaen:Le Moqueur polyglotte (part 1)

January 18, Else Marie Pade (died today in 2016)

Since July, I have been concentrating solely on female composers.  You can read about that in my post from July 19.  If I can’t find one born on the calendar day, I may not post.  On with today’s composer.

“Else Marie Pade (December 2, 1924 –  January 18, 2016) was a Danish composer born in Aarhus, a magical city which is today a hotspot of Danish arts.  As a child Pade contracted chronic pyelonephritis which, according to Wikipedia causes “persistent flank or abdominal pain, signs of infection (fever, unintentional weight loss, malaise, decreased appetite), lower urinary tract symptoms and blood in the urine.  She was confined to a bed where she listened to sounds outside her window, which she called “aural pictures.”   After getting better she started studying piano first with her mother and then with a more professional pianist.  Her playing caught the attention of the director of the People’s Music School in Aarhus, who offered her a position as a student.  There she was exposed to New Orleans Jazz, and began playing in a jazz band.

During the WW II, she joined the Danish resistance and was trained as an expert in an all women’s explosive group.  She was arrested by the Gestapo in 1944 and imprisoned in a concentration camp.  One night in the camp, she looked through a window, saw a star in the sky and heard music coming from inside her head.  She took her belt buckle and scratched the melody into the plaster of the cell wall.  She called it “You and I and the Stars.” (Which unfortunately, I cannot find on youtube.”

After the war she entered the Conservatory of Music and studied twelve-tone and heard the work of Pierre Schaeffer, who invented Musique concrète.  She started composing and became the first Dane to “compose a “”concrete” and electronic music work: A day at Bakken.”

“”Syv Cirkler” (Seven Circles)
Himmelrummet and Kong Vinter

Symphonie Magnetophonique (collaboration with Jacob Kirkegaard)
Faust (1962)

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