Melancholia and Depression with Ellington, Brahms, Chopin and Baudelaire

I’ve been writing a lot about depression this month. After all, I’m on vacation, and what could be a more refreshing topic? Surprisingly enough, I came on the vacation–in the Hudson Valley north of New York City–for the month of June with my wife to do nothing but write.

So first I need to apologize to my fellow bloggers and commentators who follow the Musical Almanac. After April’s A-Z challenges and posting twice a week for several years I needed a break. Then I need to explain why I’m choosing to write about depression.

In 2012, my best friend of 35 years, died of a brain tumor. My dad died in the Fall of 2011 following mom who passed in 2008. They were 96 and 92 respectively, and though it was a big loss, we knew it was coming so it wasn’t a shock. David’s death, on the other hand, came completely out of the blue. My wife and I had spent a week with him in Rome in August of 2010 for our honeymoon. His partner of some 30 years, Gianfraco, hailed from Ischia off the coast of Naples, Italy, and as a present, he let us stay in his apartment in his villa on the island in his mountainside home town of Buonapane overlooking the Mediterranean.

We saw David through the fall of 2010 and had dinner at him apartment in DC, in February. About a month later, one of our mutual friends who worked with David, called to say David was in the hospital and had just undergone a brainscan which revealed an egg-sized tumor deep in his brain. It was inoperable, chemo was brutal and ineffective, and he died 8 months later.

In grad school where we met, we became fast friends, sharing a love of languages, food, classical and world music. He graduated in 1979 and got a job at the university of Algiers teaching English. He sent word that he could get me a job in Algeria, too. So I joined him. From there I moved to Naples, Italy and was able to find him a position at the university there. He met Gianfranco in Naples and I met Judy, and we all returned to the States in the early 1980 to go back to college. I left with another masters and moved to the DC area first and got him a job at the University of Maryland. We were close for years and he was a good uncle to my two daughters. A gourmet cook and avid pickler, we alway loved going to his house for dinner, drinking wonderful wine, and listening to some new piece of music he had discovered. His musical tastes were eclectic and he introduced me to Bruckner, Ives, Ute Lemper, Neapolitan music, and West African Grillo music.

When he died, I was lost. He was my best and oldest male friend. At work, people commiserated but not in the way one does when a parent dies. But David was as close as any sibling or parent, and he left a hole in me. That started on down the path to another depressive episode, which lasted for almost two years.

So I’ve come on this writer’s vacation to begin writing a book about how I made it through those two years and what finally brought me out.

So today, I’m posting some pieces that bring up melancholic thoughts, or ones which I used to listen to when I was depressed. Please let me know what you think. I don’t really want to bum anyone out, but I want to share with people my struggle with depression to show that it can strike anyone and there are quite effective methods to fight it. There is so much stigma about depression, that I know many people don’t seek help when it strikes. Men are especially susceptible to those thoughts as we think that talking about our emotions is a sign of weakness. Well, I’m ready to talk and I hope it helps some people get the help they need to conquer what the french poet Charles Baudelaire called “Le Cafard,” (The Cockroach) as you can hear in this poem, “La Destruction”:

(Speaking about a Demon)
« Parfois il prend, sachant mon grand amour de l’Art,
La forme de la plus séduisante des femmes,
Et, sous de spécieux prétextes de cafard,
Accoutume ma lèvre à des philtres infâmes. »

Finally, I have to play the second movement of Brahm’s Violin Concerto. I discovered it in high school, when, a face full of acne, voice cracking, and awkward romantically around girls, I used to get the blues quite a bit. I would drown my sorrow listening to this piece repeatedly while knocking back shots of tequila and calling random numbers on the phone in the hopes I could find a sympathetic soul to talk to.

Funiculi, funiculà – Denza/Turco (1880)

kurtnemes:

This song comes from Naples, Italy, where I lived in 1980, and was written in Neapolitan dialect. It was the winner of a song competition and celebrated the funicular train that had recently been installed on the side of the volcano, Vesuvius.

Here’s a version with the original Neapolitan text and English translation:

https://www.youtube.com/embed/HH0TMmgPtjg?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent

I like this version, too by Beniamino Gigli dating from 1949:

https://www.youtube.com/embed/P0ffQl10PRE?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent

Originally posted on Songs We Were Singing:

27156-1 Luigi Denza.

This song was written by Luigi Denza and Peppino Turco in 1880. Robert Sherman and Richard Sherman wrote new lyrics to the tune in 1961 and titled the song Dream Boy. Dream Boy was recorded by Annette Funucello and released as a single. Funiculi, Funicula has been recorded by Mitch Miller And The Gang, Mario Lanza, Connie Francis, and Tony Mottola among others. The song was part of Lee Curtis and The All-Stars’ repertoire and was played in a rock style.

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Beethoven’s Pastoral Sixth and Disney in Stereo (2015May22)

kurtnemes:

An excellent tribute and reflection on the power and impact of “Fantasia” by Xperdun. I hadn’t thought about the fact that Classical music only became known to the masses with the advent of radio.

Originally posted on Xper Dunn Is Here:

Friday, May 22, 2015                                               10:52 AM

When I was a boy, I liked to lie on the floor of a dark room and listen to classical music. My closed eyes became an IMAX screen for Rorschach-fueled fantasies—vague daydreams of struggle, passion, voyaging, and victory. Back then, I didn’t listen to music the way I do now—I simply heard a soundtrack to an invisible movie. Dvorak’s New World, Tchaikovsky’s 1812, Smetana’s Moldau, Rimsky-Korsakov’s Russian Easter—they all suggested vague plotlines of grand adventures, terrific battles, and transporting joys—and Beethoven’s symphonies were right up there in my ‘top hits’ list. Classical music has always been the soundtrack to my daydreams.

Because I felt that classical music (mostly Romantic, and symphonic, at that time) was a ‘drug’ that would take me on a ‘trip’, I preferred listening to it on my bedroom record-player to sitting in the audience at Lincoln…

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Beethoven’s Sixth

Forget Fantasia and the cloying centaurs. This is one of Beethoven’s lushest and most rewarding symphonies. Kind of like a Romantic German update of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons

Write Wrote Written’s Blog on Beethoven’s 6th.

(not) Ancient Music Wednesday: Bach, Concerto for 3 Harpsichords, Strings and Basso continuo in C-Major, BWV 1064.

kurtnemes:

Great piece of luck to find this piece by Bach this bright Wednesday morning.

Originally posted on :

One of the nice things about living in Europe is, its access to Baroque era music played on 17th/18th Century original instruments. There is a little piece of joy to listen an on stage performance like this.

A Young Woman Playing a Harpsichord to a Young Man, c. (Image from : kids.britannica.com) A Young Woman Playing a Harpsichord to a Young Man, c. (Image from : kids.britannica.com)

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La Cathédrale Engloutie

kurtnemes:

A great piece of writing on Debussy.

Originally posted on Good Music Speaks:

There is a region in Northwest France that is named Brittany.  This is the home of the ethnic group of Bretons, who speak the ancient Celtic language of Breton.  This language is related to Cornish, and more distantly related to Welsh.  The ancestors of the Bretons came to this part of France over 1,000 years ago from the southern part of Great Britain.

ys bookThere is an ancient Breton tale, told in a number a versions, of the mythical city of Ys.  The city was located near the Bay of Douarnenez on the coast of the Brittany region.  There are several changing elements to the tale, but in all cases the city was below sea level and protected by the walls of a dike, with only one gate.  The king Gralon was the holder of the one and only key to the gate.  Inevitably, the key is stolen and the city…

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Debussy’s beautiful 3:28 for the Tuesday – May 5th

kurtnemes:

I’m in hot Florida this weekend, so it’s nice listening to this “cool” music.

Originally posted on Classical music player:

Before Tuesday makes you run, please use 3:28 for this beautiful, somehow hypnotizing and relaxing piece. Claude Debussy’s “Des pas sur la neige” – s’il vous plaît!

More on Debussy in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Debussy

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